Children's Reading Suggestions

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Siblings

on November 5, 2013

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Books that describe the joys and frustrations of being the older, younger and middle children in a family.

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Judy Blume. The Pain and the Great One

A six-year-old (The Pain) and his eight-year-old sister (The Great One) see each other as troublemakers and the best-loved in the family.

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Marci Curtis. Big Brother, Little Brother

Bright photos enhance this charming tale of sibling love as two brothers go about their day together playing games, wrestling, sharing a laugh, and more.

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Valorie Fisher. My Big Brother

Through a collection of amusing photos, an older brother’s love for his younger sister is captured as he makes faces, play games, blows bubbles, and tries to entertain and amaze his new sibling. 

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Jan Fearnley. Martha in the Middle

Martha, a young mouse with a sensible big sister and a cute little brother, begins to feel invisible and decides to run away, but at the end of the garden she meets a wise frog who points out just how special the middle can be.

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Elizabeth Winthrop. Squashed in the Middle

Nobody ever listens to Daisy. Her father was chopping carrots. Her mother was talking on the phone. Her big sister was chasing her little brother around and around the kitchen table. So it was no surprise that no one heard where Daisy went, even though she told them. With humorous text and striking, bold illustrations, this book captures the frustration of a middle child trying to be heard over the noise of a well-meaning family.

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Kristyn Crow. The Middle-Child Blues

With his older brother getting all the attention and his baby sister unable to do any wrong, middle child Lee decides to pick up the guitar and sing the blues, soon drawing an appreciative crowd who understands his sorrows and finally becoming the center of attention!

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Barbara Shook Hazen. Who is your favorite monster, mama?

Being a middle child, Harry Monster never seems to be able to do what his siblings do, and never seems to get enough attention from Mama Monster, but when Harry asks his mother which child is his favorite, his clever mama has just the right answer.

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Lauren Child. But, excuse me, that is my book

When Lola’s favorite book is not on the library’s shelf, her older brother, Charlie, tries to find another book she will enjoy.

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Shutta Crum. Mine!

A young child does not want to share his toys with his baby sibling, but an encounter with the family dog teaches everyone the importance of sharing.

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Bob Graham. Dimity Dumpty

What happened to Humpty Dumpty is the stuff of legend. But how many know of his brave little sister? While the Tumbling Dumpties, the family traveling circus troupe, is doing acts of spectacular daring, Dimity stays far from the spotlight, playing tunes on her tiny flute. But when Humpty falls off the wall where he’s writing graffiti, it’s Dimity who finds her voice and brings help that even the king’s soldiers can’t provide. 

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Sally Grindley. It’s My School

His sister’s first day of school is Tom’s last day of true independence. On her first day of kindergarten, Alice isn’t really that nervous at all. It’s her brother, Tom, who is upset — in fact, he’s downright mad! It’s his school, and why should he have to share it with his annoying little sister? For any family dealing with first day nerves, this bright and reassuring picture book will help ease the transition into school — both for new students and their older siblings.

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Lisa Kopelke. The Younger Brother’s Survival Guide

Having learned firsthand the hard lessons of life with regard to having a bossy older sister, like being ordered to stick candy up his nose and being locked out of the house in his underwear, young Matt has compiled his notes–creating an informative guide to help other younger siblings better handle similar humiliation and practical jokes.

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Kathryn Lasky. Lucille’s Snowsuit

Upset about having to wear a snowsuit while her older brother and sister get to wear more grown-up attire, Lucille begins to pout, but once she goes outside and plays in the snow, she quickly discovers that her suit is quite good after all.

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Deb Lucke. Boy Who Wouldn’t Swim

One very hot summer, Eric Dooley watches his younger sister go from her first swimming lesson all the way to the diving board, while his fear of the water keeps him from joining her and the rest of the people of Clermont County in the pool.

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Sally Noll. That Bothered Kate

Kate is bothered by her changing relationship with her little sister Tory, as first Tory wants to be with her and copy her all the time and then Tory neglects her for friends of her own.

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Laura Pegram. Daughter’s Day Blues

Jealous of the constant attention her baby brother gets, Phyllis Mae’s mother decides to set a special day aside for her daughter where being a daughter is celebrated all day long. 

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Patricia Polacco. My rotten redheaded older brother

After losing running, climbing, throwing, and burping competitions to her obnoxious older brother, a young girl makes a wish on a falling star.

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Judith Viorst. I’ll Fix Anthony

A little boy envisions the many things he will do to get even with his big brother, Anthony, who isn’t very nice to him.

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Martin Waddell. Once There Were Giants

As a baby girl grows up and becomes an adult, the “giants” in her family seem to grow smaller.

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Ellen Stoll Walsh. Samantha

Wishing that a fairy godmother would save her from her older, teasing siblings, Samantha is amazed when her fairy godmother appears and offers Samantha refuge under her wing until the young girl wonders if she prefers being safe to having fun.

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Catherine Walters. Play Gently, Alfie Bear

When his mother asks him to help with his baby brother and sister, Alfie Bear feels he can not do anything right.

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James Crist. Siblings: You’re stuck with each other so stick together

Brothers and sisters: they can make great friends, and it’s nice to have someone who’ll love you no matter what. But kids know siblings can be a real drag, too. Full-color illustrations and humorous, kidfriendly text teach kids how to cope with problems of fairness, jealousy, conflict, tattling, privacy, and other things that can make having siblings so difficult. Kids learn how to cope with a new baby in the home and how to handle special situations such as siblings with special needs, step-siblings, and adopted siblings. Unlike most other books on the topic, Siblings doesn’t dwell on sibling rivalry; it focuses on building positive relationships. After all, siblings can grow up to be the best of friends.


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