Children's Reading Suggestions

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If you like Diary of a Wimpy Kid, why not try…

on May 1, 2014

diary of a wimpy kidDiary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney

It’s a new school year, and Greg Heffley finds himself thrust into middle school, where undersized weaklings share the hallways with kids who are taller, meaner, and already shaving. The hazards of growing up before you’re ready are uniquely revealed through words and drawings as Greg records them in his diary.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid

Rodrick Rules

The Last Straw

Dog Days

The Ugly Truth

Cabin Fever

The Third Wheel

Hard Luck

Diary of a Wimpy Kid #9 (coming soon… 11/4/14)

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When you’ve read the whole series, why not try these other books?

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Ivy + Bean by Annie BarrowsIvy + Bean

When seven-year-old Bean plays a mean trick on her sister, she finds unexpected support for her antics from Ivy, the new neighbor, who is less boring than Bean first suspected.

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Stink by Megan McDonaldStink : the incredible shrinking kid

The shortest kid in the second grade, James Moody, also known as Stink, learns all about the shortest president of the United States, James Madison, when they celebrate Presidents’ Day at school. 

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Please Write in This Book by Mary AmatoPlease write in this book

When Ms. Wurtz leaves a blank book in the Writer’s Corner with a note encouraging those who find it to “talk to each other” in its pages, the student’s entries spark a classroom-wide battle. 

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Utterly Me, Clarice Bean by Lauren ChildUtterly me, Clarice Bean

When someone steals the winner’s trophy for the school book project, Clarice emulates her favorite book heroine, Ruby Redfort the detective. 

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Diary of a Killer Cat by Anne FineThe diary of a killer cat

Tuffy the pet cat tries to defend himself against accusations of terrifying other animals and murdering the neighbor’s rabbit.

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Lenny & Mel by Erik KraftLenny and Mel

Twin brothers observe a year’s worth of holidays in some very unusual ways. What do Labor Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s Eve, Presidents’ Day, Valentine’s Day, Cinco de Mayo, and Flag Day have in common? Find out by letting Lenny and Mel take you on a journey through the holidays. See what it takes to be a good student, get fascinating Halloween costume ideas, lose those unsightly leftovers, and pretty much tackle any holiday that fall, winter, or spring can throw at you. Well, maybe not any holiday. But several. Definitely several. 

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Alvin Ho : allergic to girls, school, and other scary things by Lenore LookAlvin Ho : allergic to girls, school, and other scary things

A young boy in Concord, Massachusetts, who loves superheroes and comes from a long line of brave Chinese farmer-warriors, wants to make friends, but first he must overcome his fear of everything. 

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Shredderman series by Wendelin van DraanenSecret identity

Fifth-grader Nolan Byrd, tired of being called names by the class bully, has a secret identity–Shredderman! After Mr. Green assigns everyone the task of becoming reporters, Nolan Byrd decides to go undercover and do an exposé via a web site on Bubba and the bullies at his school–giving them a dose of their own medicine by showing what they really are and what their classmates really think of them.

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The Strange Case of Origami Yoda by Tom AnglebergerThe strange case of Origami Yoda

Sixth-grader Tommy and his friends describe their interactions with a paper finger puppet of Yoda, worn by their weird classmate Dwight, as they try to figure out whether or not the puppet can really predict the future. Includes instructions for making Origami Yoda.

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I Represent Sean Rosen by Jeff BaronI REPRESENT SEAN ROSEN

Sean Rosen knows what he wants. A ten-million-dollar deal with a big Hollywood studio. The only problem is, he’s a kid. And he’s busy with school. And he lives far from Los Angeles or New York City. But Sean does have a laptop and a phone, and he’s smart. He’s about to have the ride of a lifetime as he discovers the ins and outs—and dos and don’ts—of becoming one of the youngest movie moguls the world’s ever known. 

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Dear Dumb Diary series by Jim BentonLet's pretend this never happened : by Jamie Kelly

In her diary, middle school student Jamie Kelly describes her life at home and at school, including her attempts to triumph over her nemesis, the beautiful and popular Angeline.

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Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girls by Meg CabotMoving day

Nine-year-old Allie Finkle has rules for everything and is even writing her own rule book, but her world is turned upside-down when she learns that her family is moving across town, which will mean a new house, school, best friend, and plenty of new rules.

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No Talking by Andrew ClementsNo talking

The noisy fifth grade boys of Laketon Elementary School challenge the equally loud fifth grade girls to a “no talking” contest. 

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Middle School is Worse than Meatloaf by Jennifer HolmMiddle school is worse than meatloaf : a year told through stuff

Ginny has ten items on her big to-do list for seventh grade. None of them, however, include accidentally turning her hair pink. Or getting sent to detention for throwing frogs in class. Or losing the lead role in the ballet recital to her ex-best friend. Or the thousand other things that can go wrong between September and June. But it looks like it’s shaping up to be that kind of a year! Here’s the story of one girl’s worst school year ever — told completely through her stuff.  

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The popularity papers : research for the social improvement and general betterment of Lydia Goldblatt & Julie Graham-Chang by Amy IgnatowThe popularity papers : research for the social improvement and general betterment of Lydia Goldblatt & Julie Graham-Chang

Lydia Goldblatt and Julie Graham-Chang are best friends with one goal: to crack the code of popularity. Lydia’s the bold one: aspiring theater star, stick-fighting enthusiast, human guinea pig. Julie’s the shy one: observer and artist, accidental field hockey star, faithful recorder. In this notebook they write down their observations and carry out experiments to try to determine what makes the popular girls tick. But somehow, when Lydia and Julie try to imitate the popular girls, their efforts don’t translate into instant popularity. Lydia ends up with a bald spot, their parents won’t stop yelling, and Julie finds herself the number-one crush of Roland Asbjørnsen. Worse, they seem to be drifting farther and farther from their goal—and each other. 

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Amelia’s Notebook by Marissa MossAmelia's notebook

The hand-lettered contents of a nine-year-old girl’s notebook, in which she records her thoughts and feelings about moving, starting school, and dealing with her older sister, as well as keeping her old best friend and making a new one. 

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Lawn Boy by Gary PaulsenLawn boy

One day I was 12 years old and broke. Then Grandma gave me Grandpa’s old riding lawnmower. I set out to mow some lawns. More people wanted me to mow their lawns. And more and more. . . . One client was Arnold the stockbroker, who offered to teach me about “the beauty of capitalism. Supply and Demand. Diversify labor. Distribute the wealth.” “Wealth?” I said. “It’s groovy, man,” said Arnold. If I’d known what was coming, I might have climbed on my mower and putted all the way home to hide in my room. But the lawn business grew and grew. So did my profits, which Arnold invested in many things. And one of them was Joey Pow the prizefighter. That’s when my 12th summer got really interesting. 

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Dork Diaries by Rachel Renee RussellTales from a not-so-fabulous life

Fourteen-year-old Nikki Maxwell writes in her diary of her struggle to be popular at her exclusive new private school, then of finding her place after she gives up on being part of the elite group.

 

 


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